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by Scott Sailor
Published on April 20, 2017

When managing the health and performance of high performing athletes, the opportunity to leverage HIT and data has never been more accessible than right now. Scott Sailor, president of the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA), discusses how a data driven training plan can improve athlete performance.

Today's athletes are like finely tuned machines: Every aspect of their physiology is carefully worked over, each variance in the athlete's condition diligently noted. Athletic trainers (ATs) are the tireless architects behind an athlete's health, both on and off the field. As technology advances, ATs should think about adjusting the way they care for their athletes.

Click here to continue reading Scott's blog on www.nata.org.

HealtheAthlete is a secure, web-based health management platform that helps you and your athletes track their health and care throughout their lifetime. Learn more here.

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